Thursday, February 16, 2012

Moonlit Moose








My 7-9 year olds created these pieces in two steps. (The cutting around the antlers was a bit labor intensive, but do-able for a small group.) The children chose between a purple or blue palette to create their tint and shade moonscapes. I think this is such a great lesson to use as a jumping off point for other projects. I told them to impress their parents later with their new knowledge of tint and shades. They started with their white moon and added just a bit of color for each tint and then finally bringing in black for their shades.Snowfall was brought in using the end of their brushes.

On a sheet of brown construction paper they followed a direct line drawing lesson to create their moose. These lines were gone over in Sharpie or oil pastel. I encouraged them to use a variety of chalk pastel in earth tones to add texture and dimension.The last step (if they chose to do so) was to add white paint in the crevices of the antlers to mimic snow. (Unfortunately, I didn't take a final photo for those- but I think it adds a great layer to the piece.)

16 comments:

  1. These are great for winter. I'll save it for next year since we aren't getting much of a winter this year. :)

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  2. Oh, aren't they gorgeous! Great work kids (and Miss Mary...) grace

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  3. Love your moosies, Mary! Is the plural of moose, meese? Ha! The cool moonscapes really highlight the warm tones of each moose. Where do you get these cool ideas for projects? You rock!

    :)Pat

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  4. I REALLY love those antlers!! They are all so different and definitely add personality:)

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  5. Mary you always make great backgrounds with interesting light! I LOVE all your moonlit stuff!! These mooses are ADORABLE!! I want to hug them! You are so creative!

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  6. These would be very appropriate for the region where I teach in Canada. In Banff (a famous National Park), it's possible to see moose. They are such huge, impressive creatures. Your kids did a great job- thanks for sharing!

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  7. How adorable are the faces of each moose.
    I love the background.

    Your students did an amazing job.

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  8. Thanks so much everyone! It's so nice to get such positive feedback. I knew I wanted to introduce my 1st-3rd graders to tints and shades with the addition of an animal that could be found in cold regions so we could add snowfall. Moose it was! Thanks again for the comments. :)

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  9. these are terrific! pos/neg shapes, tints & shades. perfect!

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  10. oh my these are fabulous!!! Your students could be book illustrators! I just love them. I looked at all of your recent post and want to share them with my fellow art teachers. I have younger children of my own that would love to paint several ideas off of your sight. I teach art to older kiddos but still am inspired but the work your kids are producing! Way to go!

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  11. I love these! So beautiful. I was wondering if you have any tips on how to teach a direct line lesson? I teach 6 and 7 year olds and I've never done it before.

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    1. Thanks Aly! I usually tell kids that a direct line drawing lesson is like a drawing game of "simon says." Basically your're breaking down an object into a series of lines and shapes. I used this photo of a moose here.
      http://pinterest.com/pin/43699058853977363/
      I drew the slope of the nose first and guided them as to the best place to start drawing on their paper.Then little by little I would continue to draw parts of the moose on the whiteboard and they would do the same. I always emphasize that each moose will look completely different and that's the beauty of art. Before every direct line drawing lesson I do, I practice a few times to figure the easiest way it would be to draw that particular thing.
      Hope this helps! Best of Luck!

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  12. Mary,
    Beautiful artwork! What kind of paint did you use for the background?

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    1. We used acrylics. Tempera could work as well.

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